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Rants, Raves & Writings by Dylan Kinnett

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When I was in college, I proposed the idea that I could write a cell phone novel for my undergraduate senior thesis. I was discouraged from that and settled on a web-based hypertext novel. Several years later, Huffington Post reports that “Five of the top ten bestsellers of 2007 in Japan were “cell phone novels.” The trend is growing.

The "less is more" philosophies of the East, such as the minimalist discipline of haiku, made the first cell phone novels a natural fit for Japanese readers. But even to a Western outsider like this columnist, this upstart medium seems well suited for English-language verse, inspirational affirmations like those found in many self-help works, or perhaps stream-of-consciousness prose in the spirit of Kerouac… to cite just a few possibilities.

via www.huffingtonpost.com

The Imaginary Voyage is an investigation into a new type of opera that emerges from the digital world (Hugill & Scott 2013, 253). The research is described in Hugill, A. and Scott, L. (2013) ‘The Imaginary Voyage’, Digital Creativity 24/3, pp. 253-257.

The user is cast in the role of voyager, travelling from island to island across the internet (or Squitty Sea). Each island has its own character and interactivity. The story is primarily modelled on the voyage of Doctor Faustroll in Alfred Jarry’s posthumously published novel Exploits and Opinions of Doctor Faustroll, Pataphysician (1911), and similar descriptions by Iambulus, Rabelais, Cyrano de Bergerac, Bacon, Swift, Borges and Perec.

via theimaginaryvoyage.com

If I have watched a video, listened to audio or if I have otherwise acted as a passive consumer, I have not “interacted” even if I did push a button to begin that passive experience.

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Unlike those who are trying to program computers to write books, the digital humanities is something else entirely. It is a new and evolving field that is a sort of catch-all for a bunch of different humanities subjects that have gone digital. Unlike those who are trying to program computers to write books, the digital […]

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If the world doesn’t yet have a strong, ongoing body of hypertext literature, could it be because the idea was born before the widespread popularity of web standards? Are the early hypertexts akin to the early attempts at bookmaking, and so will hypertext literature require an element of conservation science in order to survive? Will it be transcribed or upgraded, the way the ancient writing was transcribed from scroll, to manuscript, to book, to database?

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The first sequence of chapters of Dreaming Methods’ latest digital fiction project are now online to experience – with future chapters to follow. Told through a series of semi-interactive scenes and video sequences where narrative fragments have to be “found” in order to progress through the story, Consensus Trance begins with a protagonist who has just returned from a school reunion where strangely none of his old friends remember the same things he does.

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There’s this new, controversial anthology of nearly 4,000 poems, entitled Issue 1. It is large enough to defy the limits of traditional bookbinding, with its 3,785 pages. It defies another assumption about books, too.

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